College Algebra is an interesting course to teach because for the kids involved, the topics aren’t really new, but there are certainly new things they can discover within them, or get better insight hearing about something a second time. This last week we were starting an introduction to transformations. That prompted this bit of lesson planning:

Opening Acts

I used a set of three pre-built Desmos Activities with the group. I intended to use these last year but just never forced myself to do so.

Opener: Transformation Golf

Middle Innings: Translations with Coordinates

Closer: Practice with Symbols

For the ability level of the kids involved, these went really quickly. They are simple, straightforward activities but do present some interesting challenges. The kids really enjoyed transformation golf in particular.

It prompted a lot of good discussion and offered just enough challenge for everyone. We completed that activity in one 50 minute class period (about 40 minutes or actual working time). The other two (coordinates and symbols) were done in a single 50 minute class period. The combination of these three activities were just to job some memories and reacquaint with transformation vocabulary.

Proving Activity

A longer version came later, but using the polygon() tool in Desmos, we did a short proving behavior. We built polygons using a table, and applied some coordinate rules to those polygons. Students had to modify their polygon in 4 ways, writing down what they did. Then they submitted a link to their graph (my subtle way of teaching them how to sign-in with Desmos and save things). This took about 25-30 minutes of real class time:

I really liked the progression. Kids got to take a familiar skill and learn something new about the calculator. A few days later they did a more involved polygon transformation and applied what they learned to transformations of various parent functions (quadratic, absolute value, radical, natural log). The best part? These three days worth of lessons only took 15 minutes to map out thanks to the great resources in the Desmos Activity Library and the incredibly slick polygon command (launched only a few months ago).

Really happy with how all this came together.

Posted
AuthorJonathan Claydon